Category Archives: Anthropology

Veterinary Forensics Conference, Day 2 Continued

Have my descriptions of the goings-on at this conference gotten you excited? I hope so!

The rest of day 2 was a whirlwind. There were presentations by students at the University of Florida, one on using craniometric measurements to determine sex in canines, and one on using cellular markers, or RNA, to determine the postmortem interval.

Dog skull (photo by skullsite.co.uk)

Nancy Bradley, a former police officer turned veterinarian, spoke on collecting ballistic evidence; her expertise came after the serial shooter case in Phoenix occurred several years ago. Her emphasis on handling the ballistic evidence from the animals in that case forced law enforcement to see the value of understanding what happened to the animals, because it was directly related to the human side of the investigation. Some of her pointers: collect gun shot residue (GSR) from the body, even if it may be difficult to test due to the distortion from the fur; use trajectory rods to show the path of the bullet after taking radiographs and put the rods through all of the organs affected; ask officers if they want the bullet cleaned or preserved for cytology; and handle any projectiles with your gloved hands or with plastic forceps rather than metal since the lead is surprisingly malleable and any lands and grooves (that would be used to prove/disprove a match could potentially be marred by improper collection methods.

After this was a presentation by Belinda Lewis, a photographer who teaches officers proper photographic techniques. I really learned a lot from her. Some of the tips she shared I already knew from school: when photographing, fill the frame, maximize the depth of field, etc., but she also taught us to use 18% gray scales rather than white when photographing evidence since it can wash out the photo, and to use gray towels under bodies during necropsies for the same reason. In specific cases, look for things that are often overlooked, for example, if a dog is found starved, show that the chain it was tethered with was too short to reach any food source. And photograph all necropsies!

Finally, Douglas Mader, a veterinarian and specialist in reptiles, gave a fun and extremely interesting presentation on reptile forensics, a subject I know NOTHING about. It was truly fascinating, because he made us question what really constitutes abuse. Many people put live mice in a cage with a snake thinking that the snake will eat the mouse, but often the snake is not hungry but the mouse is… the mouse can cause sometimes severe damage to the snake by gnawing on it and the snake will typically fail to react because it’s predator instincts are not being utilized when it’s not hungry. This most likely isn’t abuse but merely a mistake. However, what if someone puts a ferret in with a snake? Picture the damage a ferret could inflict on a snake. That shows intent. And did you know that the USDA does not cover reptiles or amphibians with regards to care? And there is no published data on required cage habitats. Pictures of a puppy mill can invoke feelings of sadness and disgust. We’ve realized how horrible they are. But what about the snake breeders who keep them housed in tiny plastic cages with barely enough room to move, no stimulation or proper ventilation? Why is this not considered as reprehensible as the puppy mill? Interesting discussions also on whether or not reptiles and amphibians feel pain or stress or boredom, and, really, how we would know? Dr. Mader was SO much fun and had us laughing hysterically while still pondering some serious issues.

Snakes in breeding boxes in an incubator (photo from reptilegeeks.com). Is this acceptable??

Sadly, that was the end of the second day of presentations. The evening concluded with a business meeting, and some of us got together for dinner and drinks. I found myself exhausted but exhilarated by all of the things I had seen and learned. These conferences really make me anxious to learn more. I know that I will be back in school in the not-so-distant future, possibly pursuing anthropology, or molecular biology. Not sure yet. But this conference has sure given me much to think about!

Stay tuned for the third and last day! And as always, you can find more information on the IVFSA website!

Parked outside our hotel!

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Veterinary Forensics Conference, Day 1 Continued

Since the first Day 1 update was so incredibly long, I will try to do a better job of summing things up, but there is just so much good information to share!

The final speaker of day 1 was Dr. Mike Warren, an anthropologist and C.A. Pound Human Identification Laboratory director. His talk was very interesting as it brought to light the lack of existing information with regard to the evaluation of animal skeletal remains in a forensic concept. He stressed the need to develop veterinary forensic osteology methodology, and perhaps a database. Although the basic properties of bone are the same between species, there is a lot that is unknown: do hanged pit bulls (often seen with regard to dog fighting) suffer any variation of a hangman’s fracture (a fracture of the pedicles of the C2 vertebra) in humans? How does a quadruped’s vertebral column respond? With regard to fractures from blunt force trauma to the cranial vault, do bones fracture the same way all the time (in humans, cranial bone responds in typical patterns to blunt force trauma)? In animals, are there named fractures with known mechanisms, like Colles fractures in humans? This is an area ripe for research – I could hardly sit still, I was so excited by this!

A poster presentation followed the speakers (I was privileged to be able to present and made a lot of great contacts) and then it was time for the soiree! Great appetizers and prepared food was served:

Our happy chefs…

and of course dessert:

Fondue!

and the 2012 conference’s signature drink, the Algor Mortis:

A rum concoction that tasted much better than it’s name would imply.

After gorging ourselves there was a “Bring Your Own Slides” event, where attendees could present cases they worked.

All in all, it was a great way to start the conference! More to come…

If you’d like to be part of next year’s conference, keep checking the IVFSA website!