Category Archives: Bloodstain Pattern Analysis

Veterinary Forensics Conference, Day 2

I am blown away by all the information…

On the second day’s agenda:

Toby Wolson, a forensic scientist, spoke on bloodstain pattern analysis (BPS) and the changes this branch of forensics has experienced sine 2008. He told us that standards are being established so that every organization utilizing BPS has something to adhere to, and these are being developed through SWGSTAIN (scientific working group on BPS); in 2009 they published a source for BPA terminology. Every branch of forensics has its own SWG to develop standards to help keep the branches from being inadmissible to court. He also showed us how to take proper photos. I would have liked a bit more of the actual science and perhaps its applicability to vet forensics but the presentation was good nonetheless. Did you know that the Sam Sheppard case in 1966 was the first time that bloodspatter evidence was used in court??

Terrible photo of Toby Wolson’s presentation.

Amanda Fitch, a crime scene investigator at the University of Florida, presented on the proper methods for crime scene sketching. There’s more to it than you think! There are three main sketching techniques that can be used: a plan view, or what is essentially a floor plan, a profile view, which depicts a side view that can show the location of bullet holes or blood spatter on walls, and an exploded view, that is a floor plan view with the walls shown flat. There should always be a rough sketch done at the crime scene that can be finalized later, should a final version be needed for court. And evidence can be measured using either an X,Y coordinate method from fixed points, a triangulation method used mostly in outdoor scenes, or a baseline method, used outdoors where there are no landmarks. I will have to elaborate more on this later… this should be a branch of forensics all to itself.

Sharon Gwaltney-Brant, a veterinarian and president of IVFSA until this meeting, spoke about handling animals in methamphetamine raids. I had never even considered the possibility of this, but it’s a fairly common occurrence in certain areas. By far the most common injury to animals in these circumstances is walking through acids or fluids that have spilled, as there are many hazardous substances in these often clandestine labs. She also said to be cognizant of inhalation injuries, high ammonia levels, and aerosolized chemical spills. Institute a site safety officer and find out who needs to go into the contamination zone. All animals coming out need to be decontaminated, so take any needed evidence samples first, and be aware that blood and urine samples should be taken ASAP, although meth stays in an animal’s/person’s system longer than many drugs. Above all, consider the animal’s safety first. Many of them will be starved, neglected and abused and may need immediate care.

Once again, I have rambled on. But Day 2 isn’t over yet – there’s still lots to come! Can you tell I’m excited?? Stay tuned and don’t forget to check the IVFSA page… the location for the 2013 conference has been posted!!! Stay tuned…

South Beach morning clouds.